Interesting

Should yet have a comma?

Should I use a comma before “yet”? Yet can be used to start a contrasting element in a sentence, e.g. She was sad, yet relieved. When yet is used to set off a contrasting element of a sentence then it should have a comma before it, just like with not.

Should yet have a comma?

Should I use a comma before “yet”? Yet can be used to start a contrasting element in a sentence, e.g. She was sad, yet relieved. When yet is used to set off a contrasting element of a sentence then it should have a comma before it, just like with not.

What is a meaning of yet?

2a(1) : up to now : so far hasn’t done much yet —often used to imply the negative of a following infinitive have yet to win a game. (2) : at this or that time : so soon as now not time to go yet. b : continuously up to the present or a specified time : still is yet a new country.

Is the Oxford comma used in APA?

APA uses the serial (or Oxford) comma in lists of three or more items (i.e., Groucho, Harpo, and Zeppo).

How do you use yet in a sentence?

Put “yet” at the end of a sentence to describe something that hasn’t happened.

  1. For example, you may say, “I haven’t completed my homework yet,” or, “I haven’t eaten breakfast yet.”
  2. You can also say, “She hasn’t watched the episode yet,” or, “He hasn’t phoned me back yet.”

Should a comma go after yet?

As with ‘however’ or ‘but,’ a comma is placed AFTER ‘yet’ at the beginning of a sentence: “Yet, he didn’t want to…” [This is awkward, though. Usually, we use ‘However,’ or ‘But,’.] A comma is sometimes placed BEFORE ‘yet. ‘ For example: “I haven’t had a chance to talk with him, yet.”

What is a yet statement?

You use yet in negative statements to indicate that something has not happened up to the present time, although it probably will happen. You can also use yet in questions to ask if something has happened up to the present time. In British English the simple past tense is not normally used with this meaning of ‘yet’.

How do you punctuate yet in a sentence?

“Yet” as an adverb fits seamlessly into a sentence, and there is no reason to separate from the rest of the sentence using a comma. The only exception is “yet again,” specifically when we decide to bring it at the beginning of a sentence.