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Is to boldly go a split infinitive?

To boldly go is a split infinitive. Boldly splits to go. When you split an infinitive, you put something (usually an adverb) between the two parts: to diligently read.

Is to boldly go a split infinitive?

To boldly go is a split infinitive. Boldly splits to go. When you split an infinitive, you put something (usually an adverb) between the two parts: to diligently read.

Is to boldly go where no man has gone before a split infinitive?

The opening sequence of the Star Trek television series contains a well-known example, “to boldly go where no man has gone before”, wherein the adverb boldly was said to split the full infinitive, to go.

Can you ever split an infinitive?

Yes, generally. An infinitive is the to form of a verb: to go, to be. Writers are often taught to avoid splitting infinitives—that is, to avoid placing a term, usually an adverb, between to and the verb: to boldly go.

Why is boldly wrong?

For a long time, split infinitives like “to boldly go” were considered improper—even though some usage experts questioned whether the infinitive was being split at all. There’s no logical reason for the rule, and most modern usage guides say it’s fine to split one in the interest of clarity.

Which is correct to boldly go or to go boldly?

In my opinion, “to boldly go” shows that boldness contributed to the decision to go. Whereas “to go boldly” suggests you were going anyway, with a smattering of boldness as an afterthought.

Who said to boldly go where no man has gone before?

“Where no man has gone before” is a phrase made popular through its use in the title sequence of the original 1966–1969 Star Trek science fiction television series, describing the mission of the starship Enterprise. The complete introductory speech, spoken by William Shatner as Captain James T.

What is a split infinitive example?

An infinitive consists of the word to and the simple form of a verb (e.g. to go and to read). “To suddenly go” and “to quickly read” are examples of split infinitives because the adverbs (suddenly and quickly) split (or break up) the infinitives to go and to read.

Is to boldly go grammatically correct?

What is a Concord error?

Concord error. If the subject is plural in meaning (more than one), the verb must reflect this by having a plural form. Singular subjects must be followed by a singular verb. Advice.

Why is it bad to split an infinitive?

Infinitives are the verb form that is preceded by “to.” To split an infinitive is considered a grammatical crime in many circles. Nonetheless, there is often no good reason not to split infinitives, and in some cases it can improve clarity, avoid weak language, or prevent writing from sounding overly formal.

Why is the split infinitive no longer a mistake?

To boldly go for it: why the split infinitive is no longer a mistake. It was the Victorians who decided that splitting an infinitive was a grammatical error. Highly logical, captain: Star Trek’s ‘to boldly go’ is the most famous example of the split infinitive. Name: The split infinitive.

Is it incorrect to say “To Boldly Go where no man has gone before”?

Is it incorrect to say “To boldly go where no man has gone before”? What is the grammatical rule behind it if it is incorrect? Show activity on this post. Short answer: No, it is not wrong.

Is the infinitive of “Go” split in Star Trek?

Star Trek is still remembered for its memorable characters, imaginative storylines, and bold disregard for the proper treatment of the infinitive form of the verb “go.” For a long time, split infinitives like “to boldly go” were considered improper—even though some usage experts questioned whether the infinitive was being split at all.

What is the split infinitive name and appearance?

Name: The split infinitive. Age: 800 years. Ish. Appearance:Hideous or invisible, depending on your point of view. I’d have to say invisible, since I don’t know what it is. An infinitive is one of the many forms that a verb can take. If I say, “It is nice to know more than you” then “to know” is the infinitive of the verb know.