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What is a polymeric dispersant?

Polymeric dispersants are added to pigment dispersions and particle slurries to improve the separation of particles, maximise loading, and to prevent settling and re-agglomeration. Our polymeric dispersants offer a high surface affinity, multiple anchoring points, excellent adsorption and a large steric barrier.

What is a polymeric dispersant?

Polymeric dispersants are added to pigment dispersions and particle slurries to improve the separation of particles, maximise loading, and to prevent settling and re-agglomeration. Our polymeric dispersants offer a high surface affinity, multiple anchoring points, excellent adsorption and a large steric barrier.

How do you make pigment dispersions?

The pigment dispersion process involves replacing air-solid interfaces in the dry powder with liquid-solid interfaces and separating the clumps of pigment particles so that they are dispersed in the liquid. The dispersed particles must be separated, or they will flocculate to form new clumps.

What is pigment flocculation?

Flocculation is a result of pigment particles being attracted to each other to form loose aggregates that can be redispersed under mild shear. When pigment particles are strongly attracted to one other a cementing or agglomeration of the particles can occur.

What is a pigment dispersant?

Pigment dispersions are dry pigments dispersed in liquid material that are stabilized using resins or surfactants/additives to minimize reagglomeration, a phenomenon where the pigments come back together to form “lumps”. They can contain water, solvent, or based on a resin that is liquid at room temperature.

What are dispersants used for?

Dispersants are chemicals that are sprayed on a surface oil slick to break down the oil into smaller droplets that more readily mix with the water. Dispersants do not reduce the amount of oil entering the environment, but push the effects of the spill underwater.

What are the different types of dispersants?

A typical commercial dispersant is a mixture of three types of chemicals: solvents, additives, and most importantly, surface-active agents (i.e., surfactants).

How does a dispersing agent work?

A dispersant or a dispersing agent is a substance, typically a surfactant, that is added to a suspension of solid or liquid particles in a liquid (such as a colloid or emulsion) to improve the separation of the particles and to prevent their settling or clumping.

What is pigment agglomeration?

Agglomerates represent pigment “groupings” in which the spaces between the individual pigment particles contain air and moisture. These individual pigment particles are in contact with one another only along their edges and corners.

What are color dispersions?

DISPERSION COLORS are a water based pigment made to disperse evenly into water or epoxy resin. Use these colors to make beautiful resin art paintings, add color to your casting resin, or stain concrete and wood to bring out the texture. INTENSE COLORS are a unique nano pigment colorant.

What is pre dispersed pigment?

PRE-DISPERSED PIGMENTED CHIPS PIGMENTED NITROCELLULOSE DRY DISPERSION. “Polysperse” is our trade name for Coloured pigment dispersions in Nitrocellulose. They contain beside pigment and Nitrocellulose a gelatinizing plasticizer which act as protective colloid for the pigment.

What is the role of dispersant in pigments?

– Dispersant or dispersing agent is defined as a surface active chemical that has a solvating action on the material to be dispersed and thus promotes formation of dispersion by dispersing or suspending it. Dispersants help maintain a state of dispersion by preventing settling or aggregation. The 3 Stages of Pigment Dispersion

What makes a successful polymeric dispersant?

A successful dispersant will need universal dispersing capabilities. Polymeric dispersants have two major components in their structure – the functional groups that anchor onto the pigment surface and the polymeric chains that create a steric hindrance around the pigment.

What is the process of pigment dispersion?

In this phase of the dispersion process, pigment agglomerates are separated into smaller aggregates and primary particles. The lower the surface tension of the vehicle in which the pigment is being incorporated, the lower the energy that will be needed to disperse the pigment.

What are the dispersants required for apolar pigments?

However, for use in apolar systems, dispersing agents with wetting and stabilizing properties are required. Organic pigments typically demonstrate hydrophobic character, low surface tension and require dispersants providing optimal wetting and stability properties. This is true for aqueous as well as apolar solvent based systems.