Popular articles

How much is an original Kewpie doll worth?

According to 200 Years of Dolls (fourth edition), a 10-inch Kewpie with a bisque head, composition body, and glass eyes today is worth $6,500, while a 20-inch (510 mm) doll is valued at $20,000. Many of the original, small-sized German-produced bisque Kewpies (c. 1912-1915) range from $200–$500 among collectors.

How much is an original Kewpie doll worth?

According to 200 Years of Dolls (fourth edition), a 10-inch Kewpie with a bisque head, composition body, and glass eyes today is worth $6,500, while a 20-inch (510 mm) doll is valued at $20,000. Many of the original, small-sized German-produced bisque Kewpies (c. 1912-1915) range from $200–$500 among collectors.

Did Kewpie dolls have hair?

Back in the 1920s, Kewpie dolls were famous for their adorable eyes, budding wings, and small, lovable hair tufts.

Is Kewpie a boy or girl?

Though Kewpie was male, O’Neill managed to subvert gendered representations; keeping them nude, without a sailor uniform or any genitalia, eliminated the question of gender altogether.

What does Kewpie doll represent?

Kewpie dolls are collectible baby dolls that were created in 1912 and were immensely popular until the middle of the twentieth century. Olive sees the dolls as a symbol of Roo’s love for her. However, the dolls also symbolize Olive’s willful immaturity, as well as the immaturity of her relationship with Roo.

Do Kewpie dolls have any value?

Kewpie dolls in action like The Lawyers Kewpies can cost over $500, while those in classic standing pose can be valued as low as $10. Aside from the posturing, Kewpie dolls with original paper labels command a higher value. The doll’s condition also determines its value.

When did the Kewpie doll come out?

Originally appearing in the form of magazine illustrations between 1905 and 1909, Kewpie dolls made their appearance in 1913 in a design patented by Rose Cecil O’Neill (1874–1944).

What is a Kewpie baby?

Kewpie dolls, first manufactured in 1912, were modeled after comic strip characters drawn by Rose O’Neil starting in 1909. The cartoon characters were baby “Cupid” figures, and the word “Kewpie” is a variation of “Cupid.”

Are Kewpie dolls Japanese?

In the 1920s, Japanese doll makers openly copied the popular bisque Kewpie dolls with a vast assortment of dolls that have molded hair in addition to ones with baby-type top knot. Today, there are many more of the Japanese copies available on the market than the original German ones.

What does Kewpie mean in Japanese?

‘Kewpie’ – the Japanese word for mayonnaise Okay, so first up it’s time to explain Kewpie. The original Kewpie dolls were created in the early 1900s by an American artist, Rose O’Neill. Her idea for Kewpie was: “a sort of little round fairy whose one idea is to teach people to be merry and kind at the same time.”

Are Kewpie dolls still made?

These are some examples of Kewpie dolls, from the first Rose O’Neill antique bisque Kewpies all the way through to modern Kewpie dolls currently being produced by Charisma Dolls Company.

What is the most valuable Kewpie doll?

The most prized dolls for collectors are the early versions constructed from bisque, a form of porcelain. Those signed by Rose O’Neil are especially valuable.

Who created the Kewpie doll?

Rose O’Neill
Only one of those creators has ever found her way into Sarah Buhr’s dreams, however. That artist, Rose O’Neill, is mostly known as the inventor of the Kewpie doll, a fat, smiling cherub dubbed “the national dream child” by The New Yorker magazine in 1934.

When was the first bisque Kewpie doll made?

Bisque Kewpie, 6 Inches Tall, Circa 1912 (Front View) By Rose O’Neill, Made in Germany c. Six inch tall antique bisque Kewpie doll. The Kewpie doll was created by Rose O’Neill and is based on her original illustrations that first appeared in the Ladies Home Journal in 1909.

What does a kewpie doll look like?

All classic Kewpie dolls have a little pair of molded blue wings on the back. This back view shows those wings. This doll is nearly nine inches tall and is a later generation of Kewpie made from celluloid.

Are cameo Kewpie dolls in good condition?

In this close-up, the excellent condition of the celluloid and finish is clearly evident. Cameo company was originally a partner with Rose O’Neil in the 1920s and continued to make Kewpie dolls after her death in the 1940s.

What kind of face does a Kewpie have?

In this close-up view, you can see the soft vinyl face in excellent condition, as well as the characteristic impish smile and sideways glance that is the hallmark of Kewpie dolls. Vinyl Kewpies like this were common in the 1970s. They were inexpensive to purchase back then and are still inexpensive today.